Wipeout is a classic term used in surfing lingo to imply one being thrown off the board by a wave. It is not uncommon for surfers to get wiped out every once in a while. In fact, if you aren’t getting wiped out, it is quite possible that you aren’t pushing yourself hard enough.

What does blown out mean in surfing?

Blown out: When waves that would otherwise be good have been rendered too choppy by wind. Bomb: An exceptionally large set wave. Bottom: Refers to the ocean floor, or to the lowest part of the wave ridden by a surfer.

What are some surfing terms?

Speak like a surfer? 40 surfing terms and phrases you should know

  • Wipeout. The act of falling from your board when riding a wave.
  • Leggie. A legrope or lease.
  • Pocket. The area of the wave that’s closest to the curl or whitewash.
  • Thruster.
  • Kook.
  • Cutback.
  • Punt/Aerial.
  • Onshore/Offshore.

What happens when you wipe out on a huge wave?

Hazards of big wave surfing In a big wave wipeout, a breaking wave can push surfers down 20 to 50 feet (6.2 m to 15.5 m) below the surface. Strong currents and water action at those depths can also slam a surfer into a reef or the ocean floor, which can result in severe injuries or even death.

How do surfers not hit each other?

Surfers paddle out in the broken section of a wave being ridden. Surfers avoid dropping in on each other (right of way rules). To avoid collision, surfers tend to apply good practices at different moments: when paddling out, when paddling into a wave, when taking off, when riding, when kicking out.

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Why do surfers say Yew?

Another widely used term for surfers is “YEW!”, which is an indicator that a large wave has been spotted, however mostly shouted while a surfer is catching or has recently finished riding a wave.

What is a female surfer called?

Wahine – Female surfer. Wave Hog – Someone who catches many waves and doesn’t share with others. Trough – The point of the wave within a cycle where the wave reaches it’s lowest point.

What do surfers say when the waves are good?

When the waves are good, it’s said to be cranking. This is the art of walking up and down a longboard, foot over foot. When you see some guy / gal running up and down their board, you’ll now know what to call it. Making a cutback is reversing the direction that you are surfing in one smooth fluid move.

What to do when a wave breaks on you?

Turn your back to the wave (but look over your shoulder and keep an eye on it), hold the board with both hands on either side of the nose with your body closer to the whitewater and the board closer to the beach, and as the wave reaches you, allow yourself to sink below the water and pull down on the nose.

What to do when a wave breaks on you swimming?

In the shallows as a general rule stand sideways on to a wave with your feet wide apart. Once you’re above waist-height in the water, swim over waves, or if they’re breaking, dive under them with your arms out in front to protect your neck.

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What do surfers say to each other?

A “brodad” is a “hodad” who further irritates surfers by calling everyone “bro” — including his mom. “Totally tubular” is totally out. It was once used to describe a perfect, curled wave. But surfers may still occasionally say they’re going to “Hang 10” (to hang so far up the board that all your toes are hanging off).

What is surfer slang?

Slang for weather and surf conditions Reef Break – Usually the shallow and sharp area where a wave breaks. Glassy- Smooth and clean waves. Shorebreak/Pounders- Heavy waves along the shoreline. A Prime spot for bodyboarders. Blown-Out/Washed Out- When the afternoon winds turn the conditions choppy.

What do surfers call a big wave?

When used as in “heavy waves,” it means big, gnarly, kick ass waves. Teahupoo, Mavericks and Pipeline are three waves that would have to be described as heavy with a capital “H.” The same term can be used to describe the locals at a spot.

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